Images by Date
Images by Category
Solar System
Stars
White Dwarfs
Supernovas
Neutron Stars
Black Holes
Milky Way Galaxy
Normal Galaxies
Quasars
Galaxy Clusters
Cosmology/Deep Field
Miscellaneous
Images by Interest
Space Scoop for Kids
4K JPG
Multiwavelength
Sky Map
Constellations
Photo Blog
Top Rated Images
Image Handouts
Desktops
Fits Files
Image Tutorials
Photo Album Tutorial
False Color
Cosmic Distance
Look-Back Time
Scale & Distance
Angular Measurement
Images & Processing
AVM/Metadata
Image Use Policy
Web Shortcuts
Chandra Blog
RSS Feed
Chronicle
Email Newsletter
News & Noteworthy
Image Use Policy
Questions & Answers
Glossary of Terms
Download Guide
Get Adobe Reader
More Images: Cosmic Hand Hitting a Wall
X-ray Images of MSH 15-52
(Credit: NASA/SAO/NCSU/Borkowski et al.)
Click for large jpg X-ray
With Inset
Jpeg, Tif
Click for large jpg X-ray
No Inset
Jpeg, Tif
Click for large jpg 2004 X-ray
(Labeled)
Jpeg, Tif
Click for large jpg 2004 X-ray
(Unlabeled)
Jpeg, Tif
Click for large jpg 2008 X-ray
(Labeled)
Jpeg, Tif
Click for large jpg 2008 X-ray
(Unlabeled)
Jpeg, Tif
Click for large jpg 2018 X-ray
(Labeled)
Jpeg, Tif
Click for large jpg 2018 X-ray
(Unlabeled)
Jpeg, Tif
Astronomers have captured the movement of the expanding remains of an exploded star. Chandra data taken over 14 years show a blast wave and debris moving away from the site of the explosion. The graphics present the entire hand-shaped nebula observed by Chandra, which was produced by the pulsar left behind after the explosion. The close-ups highlight movement in the explosion's blast wave in a region located near one of the "fingertips". The fixed squares enclose clumps of magnesium and neon that likely formed in the star before it exploded and shot into space once the star blew up. Astronomers estimate that it has slowed down from the initial explosion after striking a neighboring gas cloud, but is still moving at nearly 9 million miles per hour.


Return to: Cosmic Hand Hitting a Wall (June 24, 2021)