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Cosmology/Deep Fields/X-ray Background
Animations & Video: Cosmology/Deep Fields/X-ray Background
Page 12
Click for high-resolution animation
1. Chandra X-ray Images of Six Galaxy Clusters
QuicktimeMPEG A critically important number that sets the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances and thus allows astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. These images show six of the 38 galaxy clusters that scientists observed with Chandra.
[Runtime: 0:16]
(NASA/CXC/MSFC/M.Bonamente et al.)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
2. Simulation of a Galaxy Collision
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*Broadcast Quality

This visualization shows two spiral galaxies - each with supermassive black holes at their center - as they collide. In this simulation, the brightness represents gas density while the color indicates temperature in the gas distribution. The latest Chandra results suggest that such collisions may cause extreme black hole and galaxy growth in the early Universe, setting the stage for the birth of quasars. The time scale shown in the upper left of the simulation represents millions of years.
[Runtime: 0:41]
(Tiziana Di Matteo (MPE/CMU), Volker Springel (MPE) & Lars Hernquist (Harvard))

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
3. Chandra's X-ray Image of Black Holes in the Early Universe
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*Broadcast Quality

This sequence begins with the Chandra Deep Field-North, the deepest X-ray image ever taken. Black holes that are also found in submillimeter observations, indicating active star formation in their host galaxies, are then marked. The view then zooms onto one pair of particularly close black holes (known as SMG 123616.1+621513). Astronomers believe these black holes and their galaxies are orbiting each other and will eventually merge. The sequence ends by showing an animation of this scenario.
[Runtime: 0:33]
(X-ray image: NASA/CXC/Penn State/D. Alexander et al.)

Related Chandra Images:

Page 12