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Normal Stars & Star Clusters
X-ray Astronomy Field Guide
Normal Stars & Star Clusters
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Normal Stars & Star Clusters
Chandra Images
Normal Stars & Star Clusters
Animations & Video: Normal Stars & Star Clusters
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Click for high-resolution animation
1. Constellation View of the Orion Nebula
QuicktimeMPEG This motion graphic starts with a wide-field, ground-based optical image of the Orion constellation. Next, the view zooms into an optical photograph taken by David Malin of the Orion Nebula before dissolving into a mosaic of Hubble Space Telescope images of a slightly smaller region. The sequence ends with Chandra's image of the Orion Nebula Cluster, the deepest X-ray image ever obtained of a star cluster.
[Runtime: 0:28]
(Ground-based: Akira Fujii; Optical Photograph: Copyright Anglo-Australian Observatory. Photograph by David Malin; HST: NASA/STScI/Rice Univ./C.O'Dell et al.; X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/E.Feigelson & K.Getman et al. Animation Credit: NASA/STScI/Bryan Presto)

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2. Time-Lapse Movie of Chandra Observations
QuicktimeMPEG Zooming in from the full X-ray image, this sequence shows a time-lapse movie of Chandra data covering a smaller region of the Orion Nebula. Rapid variations in the young Orion stars can be seen during this 7-day-long observation (half the full Chandra observation) which contains 50 X-ray images. The star at the center of the image shows the strongest flare recorded among 30 stars with masses close to that of the Sun. This flare is about 10,000 times more powerful than the biggest flares seen on the Sun. If the Sun were placed at the distance of the Orion Nebula, its largest flares would not be visible in this movie.
[Runtime: 0:16]
(NASA/CXC/Penn State/E.Feigelson & K.Getman et al.)

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3. Animation of X-ray Flares from a "Young Star"
QuicktimeMPEG
*Broadcast Quality

This animation shows how X-ray flares from a young star affect a planet-forming disk. Light from the young star is reflected off the inner part of the disk, making it glow. The view zooms in to show small white flares continually erupting on the surface of the young star. A set of huge white magnetic loops then erupts from the star and hits the inside edge of the disk, resulting in an extremely bright flare. X-rays from the flare then heat up the planet-forming disk and will later result in turbulence that affects the positions of planets.
[Runtime: 0:23]
View Stills
(NASA/CXC/A.Hobart)

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4. A Multiwavelength Look At Orion
QuicktimeMPEG This sequence begins with Chandra's image of the Orion Nebula Cluster, the deepest X-ray image ever obtained of a star cluster. The image contains over 1,600 X-ray sources, most of them young stars. Zooming into a smaller region at the cluster's center, the view then dissolves to an optical image from the Hubble Space Telescope of the same region, followed by an infrared image made by ESO's Very Large Telescope, before returning to the Chandra data.
[Runtime: 0:20]
(X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/E.Feigelson & K.Getman et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI/Rice University/C.O'Dell et al.; Infrared: ESO/VLT/M.McCaughrean et al.)

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5. Dissolve from Optical to X-ray Image of Westerlund 1
QuicktimeMPEG This sequence begins with an optical view of the star cluster, known as Westerlund 1. When the view dissolves into Chandra's X-ray image, the unusual neutron star -- a dense whirling ball of neutrons about 12 miles in diameter -- appears very brightly.
[Runtime: 0:08]
(Optical: ESO/WFI/2.2-m MPG; X-ray: NASA/CXC/UCLA/M.Muno et al.)

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6. Best of Chandra Images: Stars & Star Clusters
QuicktimeMPEG Chandra's X-ray observations are useful for understanding how the flaring activity of stars can change as stars evolve, and how the evolution of stars is changed if they are in a close binary system. This video presents some of the best Chandra observations of stars and star clusters.
[Runtime: 0:53]
(NASA/CXC/A.Hobart)

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7. Into the Milky Way: Quintuplet Cluster
QuicktimeMPEG This sequence begins with Chandra's X-ray view of a 900 by 400 light year swath of the center of the Milky Way. It then zooms into a smaller region where large filamentary structures are seen in radio waves. The view moves in even closer to show the Quintuplet star cluster. Named for its five brightest stars at infrared wavelengths, the Quintuplet is known to be home to hundreds of stars. Several of these are very massive stars that are rapidly losing gas from their surfaces in high-speed stellar winds. Collisions from these winds are what astronomers believe to be the source for the point-like concentrations seen in the Chandra image.
[Runtime: 0:24]
(X-ray: NASA/CXC/NWU/C.Law & F.Zadeh; IR: NASA/ESO/STScI/D.Figer et al.; Radio: NRAO/AUI/NSF/F.Zadeh et al.)

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8. Towards the Milky Way: DB00-6
QuicktimeMPEG his series of images shows the DB00-58 star cluster in context with Chandra's 900- by 400-light year mosaic of the Galactic Center. The view then transitions to radio emission from a smaller region that includes DB00-6, before showing infrared data, and ending with Chandra's X-ray close-up. . Despite DB00-6's similar appearance to DB01-42 (#1, above), the X-ray and infrared information show that DB00-6 is, in fact, a foreground object, and is significantly closer to us than 25,000 light years.
[Runtime: 0:24]
(X-ray: NASA/CXC/Northwestern U./C.Law & F.Yusef-Zadeh; Infrared: 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF; Radio: NRAO/AUI/NSF/F.Zadeh et al.)

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9. Towards the Milky Way: DB00-58
QuicktimeMPEG This series of images shows the DB00-58 star cluster in context with Chandra's 900- by 400-light year mosaic of the Galactic Center. The view then transitions to infrared emission from a smaller region that includes DB00-58, before showing Chandra's X-ray close-up. Despite DB00-58's similar appearance to DB01-42 (#1, above), the X-ray and infrared information show that DB00-58 is, in fact, a foreground object, and is significantly closer to us than 26,000 light years.
[Runtime: 0:20]
(X-ray: NASA/CXC/Northwestern U./C.Law & F.Yusef-Zadeh; Infrared: 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF)

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10. DB01-42 in context of the Milky Way Center
QuicktimeMPEG This series of images puts the cluster known as DB01-42 in context with Chandra's 900- by 400-light year mosaic of the Galactic Center. The view then transitions to radio emission from a smaller region that includes DB01-42, before showing infrared data of the same area, and ending with Chandra's X-ray close-up. Chandra's X-ray data have helped astronomers identify DB01-42 as a member of the Galactic Center. It is about 26,000 light years away from Earth.
[Runtime: 0:10]
(X-ray: NASA/CXC/Northwestern U./C.Law & F.Yusef-Zadeh; Infrared: 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF; Radio: NRAO/AUI/NSF/F.Zadeh et al.)

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