Images by Date
Images by Category
Solar System
Stars
White Dwarfs
Supernovas
Neutron Stars
Black Holes
Milky Way Galaxy
Normal Galaxies
Quasars
Galaxy Clusters
Cosmology/Deep Field
Miscellaneous
Images by Interest
Chandra for Kids
Multiwavelength
Sky Map
Constellations
3D Wall
Photo Blog
Top Rated Images
Image Handouts
Desktops
High Res Prints
Fits Files
Image Tutorials
Photo Album Tutorial
False Color
Cosmic Distance
Look-Back Time
Scale & Distance
Angular Measurement
Images & Processing
AVM/Metadata
Getting Hard Copies
Image Use Policy
Web Shortcuts
Chandra Blog
RSS Feed
Chandra Mobile
Chronicle
Email Newsletter
News & Noteworthy
Image Use Policy
Questions & Answers
Glossary of Terms
Download Guide
Get Adobe Reader

NASA TV press conference:

NASA's Chandra Finds Massive Black Holes Common in Early Universe


Wednesday, June 15, 2011 (1:00 p.m. Eastern)

Using the deepest X-ray image ever taken, astronomers found the first direct evidence that massive black holes were common in the early universe. This discovery from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows that very young black holes grew more aggressively than previously thought, in tandem with the growth of their host galaxies.


A video will air on NASA Television on June 15 (check the NASA TV schedule for additional times and information).


Panelists:

Ezequiel Treister Ezequiel Treister, (Einstein Fellow, University of Hawaii)
Kevin Schawinski Kevin Schawinski, (Einstein Fellow, Yale University)
Priyamvada Natarajan Priyamvada Natarajan, (Professor, Yale University)
Mitch Begelman Mitch Begelman, (Professor, University of Colorado)

Bios Page

Graphics:


Figure 1. Motion Graphic: This sequence of images zooms into the 4-million-second exposure of the Chandra Deep Field South.


Figure 2. Illustration of galaxy in early universe


Figure 3. Illustration of the center of this young galaxy.

Sagittarius A*

Figure 4.Sagittarius A* image.


Figure 5. Animation: This animation shows an artist's impression of a distant galaxy and its hidden black hole found in an epoch when the Universe was less than one billion years old.


Figure 6. Close-up of supermassive black hole.


Figure 7. Reionization in the early universe

Supplementary Graphics


Figure 1. Chandra 4Ms CDFS image.


Figure 2. Chandra/HST composite and Two Stacked Chandra images

Additional Information

Paper Title: "Black Hole Growth in the Early Universe is Self-Regulated and Largely Hidden From View"

Full Author List: Ezequiel Treister, Kevin Schawinski, Marta Volonteri, Priyamvada Natarajan, and Eric Gawiser

Scientist Contact Information:
Ezequiel Treister: treister@ifa.hawaii.edu
Kevin Schawinski: kevin.schawinski@yale.edu
Priyamvada Natarajan: priyamvada.natarajan@yale.edu
Mitch Begelman: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

Links:
Photo Album
Press Room
Image Captions
Back To Top