Images by Date
Images by Category
Solar System
Stars
White Dwarfs
Supernovas
Neutron Stars
Black Holes
Milky Way Galaxy
Normal Galaxies
Quasars
Galaxy Clusters
Cosmology/Deep Field
Miscellaneous
Images by Interest
Chandra for Kids
Multiwavelength
Sky Map
Constellations
3D Wall
Photo Blog
Top Rated Images
Image Handouts
Desktops
High Res Prints
Fits Files
Image Tutorials
Photo Album Tutorial
False Color
Cosmic Distance
Look-Back Time
Scale & Distance
Angular Measurement
Images & Processing
AVM/Metadata
Getting Hard Copies
Image Use Policy
Web Shortcuts
Chandra Blog
RSS Feed
Chandra Mobile
Chronicle
Email Newsletter
News & Noteworthy
Image Use Policy
Questions & Answers
Glossary of Terms
Download Guide
Get Adobe Reader
More Images of PSR J0108-1431
1
Click for large jpg Composite
Full field
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg X-ray

Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Optical

Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Composite
Zoom
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg X-ray
Zoom
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Optical
Zoom
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Chandra X-ray & ESO Optical Images of PSR J0108-1431
The X-ray image is from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (purple) and the optical image is from the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (red, green and blue). The Chandra source in the center of the image is the ancient pulsar PSR J0108-1431 (J0108 for short), located only 770 light years from us. The elongated object immediately to its upper right is a background galaxy that is unrelated to the pulsar. Since J0108 is located a long way from the plane of our galaxy, many distant galaxies are visible in the larger-scale optical image.
(Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/G.Pavlov et al.; Optical: ESO/VLT/UCL/R.Mignani et al.)

2
Illustration of Pulsar J0108-1431
This artist's impression shows what the pulsar J0108 might look like if viewed up close. Radiation from particles spiraling around magnetic fields is shown along with heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Both of these effects are expected to generate X-ray emission. Most of the surface of the neutron star is expected to be too cool to produce X-rays, but it should produce optical and ultraviolet radiation. Thus, multiwavelength observations are important for providing a complete picture of these exotic objects.
(Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss.)

3
PSR J0108-1431 with Scale Bar
(Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/G.Pavlov et al.; Optical: ESO/VLT/UCL/R.Mignani et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss.

Return to PSR J0108-1431 (February 26, 2009)