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More Images of Andromeda Galaxy (M31)
1
Chandra X-ray & Spitzer Infrared Image of Andromeda Galaxy (M31)
Andromeda, a large spiral galaxy much like our Milky Way Galaxy, is relatively nearby and can be easily seen with binoculars in the autumn sky. The galaxy's central region is called the galactic bulge because the stars form a ball a few thousand light years in diameter that extends above and below the disk of the galaxy. In this Chandra/Spitzer composite, red represents Spitzer's 24 micron mid-infrared data, green represents low-energy X-rays from Chandra (0.5-2.0 keV), and blue represents high-energy X-rays from Chandra (2.0-4.0 keV).
Scale: Image is 28 arcmin per side
(Credit: X-ray: NASA/UMass/Z.Li & Q.D.Wang; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

2
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Jpeg, Tif, PS
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Optical
Jpeg, Tif, PS
NOAO Optical & Chandra X-ray Image of Andromeda Galaxy (M31)
The optical image of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) was taken at the NSF's 0.9-meter telescope on Kitt Peak with the NOAO Mosaic CCD camera. Located in the constellation Andromeda ("the Princess"), M31 is a large spiral galaxy very similar to the Milky Way.
Scale: Chandra image is 28 arcmin per side
(Credit: Optical: NOAO/AURA/NSF/T.A.Rector & B.A.Wolpa; X-ray: NASA/UMass/Z.Li & Q.D.Wang)

3
M31 with Scale Bar


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