G54.1+0.3

A new image from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Spitzer Space Telescope shows the dusty remains of a collapsed star. The dust is flying past and engulfing a nearby family of stars. Scientists think the stars in the image are part of a stellar cluster in which the a supernova exploded. The material ejected in the explosion is now blowing past these stars at high velocities.

The composite image of G54.1+0.3 shows X-rays from Chandra in blue, and data from Spitzer in green (shorter wavelength infrared) and red-yellow (longer wavelength infrared). The white source near the center of the image is a dense, rapidly rotating neutron star, or "pulsar," left behind after a core-collapse supernova explosion. The pulsar generates a wind of high-energy particles -- seen in the Chandra data -- that expands into the surrounding environment, illuminating the material ejected in the supernova explosion.

More: http://www.chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/g541/

Carnival of Space

-K. Arcand, CXC


5
Average: 5 (2 votes)

Old but still

Old but still incredible.


earth full of mysteries

It looks amazing! thanks for sharing

gennie


Fascinating!

Incredible image via Chandra. I'm amazed at how we can now capture images like this one. Makes us feel really small as there is just so much out there in the universe.

- N


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