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Recent Podcast
A Tour of GRB 140903A
A Tour of GRB 140903A
Gamma-ray bursts are some of the most powerful explosions in the Universe. (2016-07-19)
Chandra X-ray Observatory Podcasts (Standard Definition)

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Video Podcast Listing: Full Feature (4-12 min)


The Universe Darkly (02-29-2008)
When you look up at the night sky, you see a lot of things glowing like stars, planets, and galaxies. So it might sound strange to hear that most of the Universe is actually dark. The truth is the protons, neutrons and electrons that make up everything we can see, and that means everything with telescopes we've got, accounts for only about 4% of the mass and energy of the Universe. The rest is dark and mysterious. More specifically, about 70% of the Universe is what is known as dark energy; about 26% is so-called dark matter. Modern day astronomers have developed many tactics to explore the dark Universe, including using telescopes like Chandra.

- Related Links:
--  The Universe in a Jelly Bean Jar
--  The Universe

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Chandra in the (Google) Sky (01-29-2008)
Astronomy is truly in a golden age. With a fleet of space-based observatories, including the Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers now have a suite of amazing tools to study the Universe. Simultaneously to this bonanza in astronomy has been the growth and expansion of the Internet. Think back to before 1990. The Internet was barely a rumor and there were no Great Observatories! But now people are taking advantage of these two seemingly separate advances to do some amazing things


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What's in a Name? (01-02-2008)
Names in astronomy don't always tell the whole story. Let's take, for example, radio galaxies. Why, might you ask, would a Chandra podcast talk about such an object? The answer is that radio galaxies are, yes, very bright in radio emission. But they are also powerful emitters of X-rays, optical light and from other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. More than that, they are important objects that really have played a very big role in how the Universe has evolved.

- Related Links:
--  3C321

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The Truth and Lies about Black Holes (11-30-2007)
Black holes have a bad reputation. After all, something that could swallow you completely sounds pretty scary. They're invisible, so maybe there's one just around the corner and we dont know it! Also, arent they enormous vacuum cleaners capable of destroying anything that gets near them? Once the black hole starts pulling on something, isnt that just a one-way ticket to oblivion? Well, not all of these things are exactly true.


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When Will History Repeat Itself? (10-31-2007)
Astronomers think that a supernova should go off in our own Milky Way galaxy every 50 years or so. When was the last one we've seen? Probably 1604. Yes, that's over 400 years ago. This being astronomy however, things will undoubtedly average out over the long run, but in the meantime, we're left without a recent supernova in our Galaxy to study. Luckily for us, astronomers from previous centuries were on the case.

- Related Links:
--  Blasts From The Past: Historic Supernovas

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Please note: These podcasts include artist illustrations and conceptual animations in addition to astronomical data.