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Q&A: Black Holes

Q:
When a black hole sucks a star-in-main-sequence what happens to it once inside? Will it continue the sequence? Can we expect Supernovas inside or will the cycle end very abruptly? Won't the swallowing action upset or alter the "mutual" gravitational attraction the star had with other celestial bodies (especially when the star is binary)?

A:
Once a star passes beyond the event horizon of a black hole, its evolutionary cycle will definitely be disrupted. For a supermassive black hole of the type that exists at the center of our galaxy, the star will be torn apart before it gets to the event horizon. For billion-solar mass black holes, it may survive the passage, but not for long. No stable orbit exists inside the black hole, so the star will descend deeper into the black hole at near the speed of light, and will be torn apart in a matter of days.

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