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Q&A: Black Holes

Q:
Could it be that a "Black Hole" isn't a black hole at all, but is a point in space that has attained not only critical mass, or gravity, but also critical momentum and speed and anything and everything that approaches it, whether it be neutrinos, or hydrogen, or iron, is ionized and turned into its molecular constituents and flung out into the cosmos as more of a "white hole" matter producing engine? Sort of a "Big Bang" on a smaller scale, but spread randomly throughout the cosmos to keep the process of gas, condensation, star and planet production, collapse, and nova, and pulsar, or white hole rhythm continuing and going forever? Could not these spectral lines be given that interpretation?

A:
Please refer to our Chandra Chronicle article "Black Holes, Buzz, Breakfast & Burbidge" http://chandra.harvard.edu/chronicle/0100/aas.html (Feb 22, 2000)

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