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More Images of SN 1979C
1
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Illustration of Supernova Remnant and Black Hole
This artist's impression shows SN 1979C in the galaxy M100, viewed from close range about 30 years after the explosion. The remains of the supernova are shown on the left, including the blast wave from the explosion and a bright central source. A close-up of this central source is shown on the right, where a bright disk of material is falling onto a black hole. A neutron star was likely created in the collapse of the original massive star. The black hole may have formed later when material remaining behind after the explosion fell onto the neutron star and the star's mass limit was exceeded.
(Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss)
2
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X-ray, Optical and Infrared Images of M100
Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have found evidence for the youngest black hole known in our cosmic neighborhood -- a mere 30 years old -- that provides a unique opportunity to watch a black hole develop during its infancy. The object is a supernova known as SN 1979c that lies in the galaxy M100. These results could help scientists better understand how massive stars explode, which ones leave behind black holes or neutron stars, and how many black holes are in our galaxy and others.
(Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/D.Patnaude et al, Optical: ESO/VLT, Infrared: NASA/JPL/Caltech)
3
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Wide Field Images of Virgo Cluster
These images show the Digitized Sky Survey that covers part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies. The zoom into the spiral galaxy M100 is shown in the second image.
(Credit: DSS)
4
SN 1979C with Scale Bar
(Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/D.Patnaude et al, Optical: ESO/VLT, Infrared: NASA/JPL/Caltech)

Return to SN 1979C (November 15, 2010)