SGR 0418+5729 in 60 Seconds

Narrator (Joseph DePasquale, CXC): A magnetar is a type of neutron star that occasionally generates bursts of X-rays. They usually have a very strong magnetic field on their surface, ten to a thousand times stronger than for an average neutron star. Now, astronomers have spotted a magnetar, called SGR 0418, with a much lower magnetic field on its surface. Data from Chandra and several other X-ray observatories was used to make this measurement. The magnetar is seen as the pink source in the middle of this image combining Chandra data with optical and infrared data. SGR 0418 is located in our galaxy about 6,500 light years from Earth. In this artist’s impression we see a close-up view of SGR 0418, with a weak magnetic field on the surface and a much stronger magnetic field in the interior. These results suggest that magnetars might be much more common than previously thought. They also tell us about the massive stars and supernova explosions that create magnetars.

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And there are others …

Flock of Scarlet Ibis Birds/Star Formation Region of The Rosette Nebula

The Tree of Life in Africa/Perseus Galaxy Cluster

The Great Barrier Reef/Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

These pairings are, of course, just a sample of the untold number of comparisons that can be made. Look around you. Do you see other connections that might bridge the gap between two very different disciplines?

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