4C+29.30 in 60 Seconds

Narrator (Joseph DePasquale, CXC): Astronomers think that just about every galaxy contains a giant, or supermassive, black hole at their center. Sometimes the intense gravity of these black holes can be tapped to produce intense power. That's what is happening in the galaxy known as 4C+29.30, which is found some 850 million light years from Earth. By looking at this galaxy with different telescopes, astronomers can get a more complete picture. Radio data show two jets of particles that are speeding at millions of miles per hour away from the supermassive black hole. X-rays from Chandra trace the location of hot gas in the galaxy. The bright X-rays in the center of the image mark a pool of million-degree gas around the black hole. Some of this material may eventually be consumed by the black hole, and the magnetized, whirlpool of gas near the black hole could, in turn, trigger more output to the radio jet. Most of the low-energy X-rays around the black hole are absorbed by dust and gas, which is probably in the shape of a giant doughnut around the black hole. This doughnut, or torus, blocks all the optical light produced near the black hole, so astronomers refer to this type of source as a hidden or buried black hole.

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And there are others …

Flock of Scarlet Ibis Birds/Star Formation Region of The Rosette Nebula

The Tree of Life in Africa/Perseus Galaxy Cluster

The Great Barrier Reef/Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

These pairings are, of course, just a sample of the untold number of comparisons that can be made. Look around you. Do you see other connections that might bridge the gap between two very different disciplines?

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