Dark Energy Trailer on YouTube

By now, you've probably seen the news stories on our exciting and important new work on dark energy. For those of you who want even more, take a look at this posting on YouTube. The main scientist behind these results, Alexey Vikhlinin of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, put together a great movie describing the new science.

Watch the video on Youtube

Doing More with More

Back in 2002, we released a colorful image of the star-forming region known as 30 Doradus (also called the Tarantula Nebula.) At the time, we thought it was a beautiful image – and it was – of this pocket of intense stellar birth and death in the neighboring Large Magellanic Cloud.

30 Doradus
Chandra's 30 Doradus from 2002 (left) and 2008 (right)

X-ray 101

There are those of us who are experts, and then those of us who are not. Even some of us who have been working in X-ray astronomy can lose track of some of the basics. To help provide a little introduction or perhaps just a refresher, we’ve put together a little thing we like to call “X-ray 101”. It’s meant just to give a very quick overview of what Chandra is and what X-ray astronomy is all about.

baseball image from activity
A sample image from the activity

Happy Anniversary, Einstein Observatory!

While we like to focus on the current excitement in X-ray astronomy, sometimes it's good to look back. Last week marked the 30th anniversary of the launch of the Einstein Observatory. Back on November 13, 1978, the High Energy Astrophysics Observatory 2 was launched on Atlas-Centaur booster rocket. Shortly afterward, the satellite was renamed in honor of that little known scientist, Albert Einstein. While HEAO-2 is catchy, we think Einstein is a little easier off the tongue.

The Latest New Thing

If you haven't noticed by now, we like new things around here. In fact, it almost pains us to see something out there that's fun and exciting that we’re not a part of. So to remedy that, we just try to get Chandra involved with everything we can. The latest, in our humble opinion, is very cool.

3d wall

From One X-ray Mission to Another

As many of this blog's readers may know, Chandra is NASA's flagship X-ray mission but it's not the only major X-ray telescope in orbit. The other one is XMM-Newton, which was launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) just five months after Chandra in 1999. The great thing about Chandra and XMM-Newton is that many of their capabilities are complementary. In other words, scientists often use both and can combine the data for even stronger results.

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