In the next installation of our new "Meet an Astronomer" series here on the Chandra blog, we introduce you to Dr. Peter Edmonds. Peter has been a part of our Education and Public Outreach group since 2003 and he has been an invaluable member of our team ever since. He helps find, track and develop the Chandra stories that we publicize, and he's instrumental in striking the right balance between scientific detail and public understanding. As a native of Australia, he hasn't lost his love for cricket, but his years in the Boston area has led to a ever-developing appreciation for American baseball and, in particular, the Red Sox.



Carnival of Space

-Megan Watzke, CXC

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I love the "meet an astronomer" series. Keep it up!

Ryan


Thanks for your question.

Thanks for your question. There are some more details about the HETG here:
http://cxc.harvard.edu/proposer/POG/html/HETG.html
http://space.mit.edu/HETG/index.html
http://space.mit.edu/HETG/flight.html

For the LETG see:

http://cxc.harvard.edu/proposer/POG/html/LETG.html
http://cxc.harvard.edu/cal/Letg/

These are mainly descriptions of current performance rather than a history.
I suggest that you ask Dan Dewey (dd@space.mit.edu) any detailed questions about the HETG and Jeremy Drake (jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu) any detailed
questions about the LETG. In general, the gratings are performing very well and producing some excellent science.

For more interesting description of the history, a book by Wallace and Karen Tucker describes the development of Chandra including work on the
HETG and LETG. It's available at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Revealing-Universe-Making-Chandra-Observatory/dp/0...

-P.Edmonds, CXC


Chandra's Optical Transmision Gratings

Hello Dr. Edmonds

I'm not sure this is the right forum for my question but if not I would appreciate some help in directing it to the right person.

I would like to know the operational status and history of Chandra's Optical Transmission Gratings (HETG & LETG). My interest stems from the work I performed as an Eastman Kodak Co. manufacturing engineer on AXAF (now Chandra). Although my primary responsibility involved integrating the telescope into its TRW space craft I did some early development work with Clyde Drauglis on the prototype OTG hinge mechanisms.

As a born and bred Bostonian (Oak Square, Brighton),
now exiled to Upstate New York, I want to welcome you to Bean Town and salute your appreciation of the Red Sox.

Any light you can shed on the OTGs will be greatly appreciated.

Steve Alpert-Gillis
SteveAgil@aol.com

Go Sox!


Dr. Peter Edmonds is

Dr. Peter Edmonds is outreach scientist for the Chandra X-ray Observatory advertising the wonderful science done with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. His main research interests are binaries and globular clusters, with an emphasis on Hubble and Chandra observations. He studied science at the University of Sydney as an undergraduate, followed by a Ph.D., codigo de barras also at the University of Sydney, where he studied pulsating stars using the Anglo-Australian Telescope. After losing too many battles with clouds he was keen to change over to space-based observing. He moved to Baltimore, Maryland for a postdoc at the Space Telescope Science Institute, followed by a postdoc at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA).


Welcome

Welcome to DR. Peter Edmonds and his writings on this blog is very lucid for us who are new to the astronomy.


Meet An Astronomer: Peter Edmonds

Very interesting post. Recommend to everybody in the field.


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